Education

Some Education and Health Cuts Restored

Octobr 5, 2016

read here

Appeals Court Rules Against Tobacco Tax Initiative

July 8, 2016

A state appeals court ruled Friday that the ballot summary for the proposed constitutional amendment to raise the tobacco tax was “unfair, insufficient and likely to mislead voters.”

July 10, 2016 St. Louis Public Radio reports that “Backers of a ballot proposal to increase Missouri’s tobacco tax apparently have only until 4 p.m. Monday to seek a rehearing or an appeal of a court ruling that otherwise could keep the measure off the November ballot.”

Read more here.

Good News! A Child Care Rating System for Missouri

May 12, 2016

The Missouri legislature gave final approval to a bill that would create a rating system to evaluate and improve child care quality.

It’s a move proponents say will pave the way for the state to compete for millions of dollars of federal grants for early childhood education, while giving parents a set of point-scale ratings on how well day cares are performing.      Read more here

St. Louis Apprenticeship in Child Care First in Nation

Advocates in the child-care community have long lamented the dearth of qualified child-care providers, particularly in poorer communities.  A new apprenticeship program is working to address this.  Click here.

Flance Center Example of Positive model for early learning

photo from Flance Center website

photo from Flance Center website

 

Mary Clemons, Women’s Voices board member, had an opportunity to tour the Flance Early Learning Center at the invitation of member Christa Shatz, and with a small group learn about the vision of the Center and the education philosophy.   In the 63106 zip code (which has the lowest life expectancy in the St. Louis region), Flance is a mixed income center that can serve 154 children six weeks to six years.

 

The building is in the heart of the Carr Square Village and across the street from the IMG_2883Jefferson elementary school.  The building developed by Urban Strategies has received an award from the American Institute of Architects, is LEED certified and includes a clinic, staffed by a nurse practitioner from Grace Hill clinic, a demonstration kitchen, 13 classrooms, community rooms, a playground with water features and a community garden.

The programs for the children are modeled on the well respected Lume Approach used by the University City Children’s Center.   Thanks to Sandra Moore, President of Urban Strategies, Steve Zwolak, Executive director, LUME), and Mark Cross, Center Director for the opportunity to learn about the center and  how a quality early childhood program can improve the well being and health of the community, and ultimately lower high school dropout rate.

 

Women’s Voices co-founder Barbara Finch writes about need to improve educational outcomes for our students

From Post-Dispatch, June 25, 2015

read here

 

K-12 Education

Women’s Voices is concerned about the quality of education available to all children, but especially children in schools that are not fully accredited.  We have consistently:

  • advocated for fully funding  the K-12 funding formula in Missouri
  • advocated for legislation at the state and federal levels that advances the quality of public education

Programs

Trends in Urban Education: Understanding Charter & Traditional Schools   September 13,  2012

Speakers: Dr. Kelvin Adams, Superintendent of the St. Louis Public Schools and Kelly Garrett, Executive Director of KIPP St. Louis

A near-capacity crowd filled the Ethical Society’s Assembly hall to hear two of the most important educators in St. Louis talk about the schools they run and their determination to improve education for under served students in St. Louis.  Read more

 Improving Urban Education   February 11, 2010

Speaker: Henry S. Webber, Executive Vice-Chancellor for Administration and Senior Lecturer, Washington University

Fewer than half of big-city students graduate from high school and only 9 percent graduate from college.These rates are an improvement over the past, so why is this important?  Read more