Ballot Measure Positions

Women’s Voices Raised for Social Justice Members have approved the following recommendations on the measures scheduled to be on the November 2018 ballot in Missouri:

Constitutional Amendment 1, Lobbying, Campaign Finance, and Redistricting Initiative (Clean Missouri) 

Passed: November, 2018 ballot

Women’s Voices position:  Support Amendment 1 (Vote YES!)

 

Amendment 1, Lobbying, Campaign Finance, and Redistricting Initiative (Clean Missouri) would change the Missouri Constitution to require a “cooling off” period of two calendar years before members of the General Assembly or their staff can become paid lobbyists; limit lobbyist gifts to $5; limit campaign contributions in a given election to $2,500 for state senate elections and $2,000 for state representative elections; require that redistricting maps be created by a nonpartisan state demographer with the goal of partisan fairness and competitiveness; require legislative records to be public records; prohibit political fundraising in the state capitol on property owned by the state or an agency of the

Reasons we support: Wealthy individual and large corporate donors have disproportionate influence in Missouri elections because Missouri has no campaign contribution limits. Lobbyists provide more than $870,000 in gifts to state representatives and senators annually. Since 2012, only one in every 10 elections has been competitive. Half of the General Assembly races in November 2016 had a single candidate on the ballot. Amendment 1 has bipartisan support and will level the playing field so individuals and corporations with access to money will not have an undue influence in elections and policymaking.

 

Constitutional Amendment 2, Medical Marijuana and Veteran Healthcare Initiative (New Approach Amendment)

Passed: November, 2018 ballot

Women’s Voices position:  Oppose Amendment 2 (Vote NO!)

 

Amendment 2, Medical Marijuana and Veteran Healthcare Initiative (New Approach Amendment) would allow the use of marijuana for medical purposes; create regulations and licensing/certification procedures; impose a 4% tax on retail marijuana sales, and use the funds for health care services for military

Reasons we oppose:  We do not believe that we should amend our constitution to address medical marijuana use. The proposal does not specify how much of the 4% tax would be used for veterans.

 

Constitutional Amendment 3, Medical Marijuana and Biomedical Research and Drug Institute Initiative (Find the Cures/Bradshaw Amendment)

Failed: November, 2018 ballot

Women’s Voices position:  Oppose Amendment 3 (Vote NO!)

 

Amendment 3, Medical Marijuana and Biomedical Research and Drug Institute Initiative (Find the Cures/Bradshaw Amendment) would allow use of marijuana for medical purposes and create regulations through a new independent entity called Biomedical Research and Drug Development Institute; and would impose a 15% tax on marijuana sales and use these funds to establish the institute.

Reasons we oppose:  The initiative was sponsored by a wealthy lawyer and would impose the highest tax on marijuana in the country; and the sponsor would appoint the new entity’s board of directors.

 

Proposition B, $12 minimum wage initiative

Passed: November, 2018 ballot

Women’s Voices position:  Support Proposition B (Vote YES!)

 

Proposition B, $12 minimum wage initiative would raise the minimum hourly wage over a five-year period from the current $7.85 to $12.00 in 2023; government employers are exempt; private sector employers who fail to comply would face penalties.

Reasons we support:  Women’s Voices members have approved a position paper that calls for raising the minimum wage. More than 350 Missouri businesses have officially endorsed raising the wage. We realize $12.00 is not a livable wage, but this proposition is a start, increasing hourly wages by $4.15 in five years. The 2016 Economic Policy Institute found that for every $1.00 increase in minimum wages, the share of workers receiving public assistance is reduced by over 3%. Without the raise, by 2023, the share of workers receiving public benefits would be close to 10%.

 

Proposition C, Medical Marijuana and Veterans Health Care Services Education, Drug Treatment, and Public Safety Initiative (Missourians for Patient Care Act) 

Failed: November, 2018 ballot

Women’s Voices position:  Support Proposition C (Vote YES!)

 

Proposition C, Medical Marijuana and Veterans Health Care Services Education, Drug Treatment, and Public Safety Initiative (Missourians for Patient Care Act) would legalize marijuana for medical purposes by removing state prohibitions when there is a written certification by a physician who treats patients diagnosed with a qualifying condition; removes state prohibition of marijuana growth, which is to be regulated by the Department of Health and Senior Services; and imposes a 2% tax on retail sales, to be used for veterans services, drug treatment, education, and public safety.

Reasons we support: Marijuana has proven effective for treating some medical conditions. This initiative would use existing state agencies to regulate doctors, production facilities, and retail sale. Missouri patients could receive medication they need, and Missouri, like other states allowing medical marijuana, would benefit from the revenue.

 

 

 

Past 2018 Ballot Measures

Proposition A – Right To Work Referendum

Failed: August, 2018 ballot

Women’s Voices position:  Oppose Proposition A

Members of Women’s’ Voices Raised for Social Justice approved  a position paper on minimum wage and “right to work” laws in 2013.  Approval of Proposition A (to be voted on in August) will make Missouri a “right to work” state. This means that no person can be required to join a labor union or pay dues to a labor union as a condition of employment.

In 2017 the Missouri legislature passed SB19, which designated Missouri as a “right to work” state. The law was put on hold when citizens collected a sufficient number of signatures to put the repeal of SB19 on the ballot as a referendum.

Women’s Voices opposes “right to work” laws because:

  • They reduce the power of workers to bargain for wages that promote the growth of the middle class
  • Evidence exists that weakening unions leads to lower wages overall for both union and non-union workers
  • “Right to work states” have lower rates of employer-sponsored health insurance and pensions
  • There is no definitive evidence that businesses flock to “right to work” states. Business owners may stand to gain when a state enacts “right to work laws”, but the overall economy does not improve.

Previous Years Ballot Measures